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Monday, 12 February 2018 02:16

MyClub to PEN: Shaking off the Sweat (P1) Featured

Written by Janguv

Picture the scene.
Your players keep making stray passes; the intermittent lag isn’t helping. The player-switching bug is still in full effect (despite the patch). Your opponent – a frantic button-mashing toddler – has been spamming 1-2 lofted through balls all match, but you’ve had his number. That is, until now, when your CB falls over (your opponent set the pitch conditions to “wet”), you can’t select your DMF, and Usain F*cking Bolt has just broken through your back line.

You’re trying to cover, but nothing is working, and meanwhile, your opponent is flashing his pause button constantly in a bid to distract you. It goes in. The shame; the pure frustration. For the last twenty game-minutes, this wretched moron passes the ball around the back, and you can’t do anything about it. He’s also still flashing the pause button, for good measure.

The members of ProEvoNetwork have mixed feelings about Konami’s moneymaking mode, myClub. Unsurprisingly, a large contingent hate it. Normally they’re the older, cynical type, but it’s arguably the norm. Indeed, disdain for myClub – affectionately renamed “bumclub” – is rarely concealed on PEN. (I’ve tried to subtly introduce “myChub”, but it’s not really taken hold…) For good reason.

While there are still plenty on PEN who legitimately enjoy myClub (some of them even part with cash for it), ultimately the critics do have valid concerns. All competitive gaming modes foster and thrive on exploiting game mechanics to find shortcuts to success. In that respect, PES is unfortunately no different: myClub is commonly a “win at all costs” experience.

But it gets worse. Given that myClub, inspired by FIFA’s “FUT” mode, allows players to spend money using microtransactions, players often have a monetary investment in the mode (albeit not one with financial rewards), and so they feel they must see their real-life money have an in-game payoff.

All this leads to a general trend: abuse the game until it no longer represents anything much like football. MyClub has become the refuge of long-ball spammers, PA2/3 bums, absurdly high lines, lag cheaters, pause spammers, constant reckless slide-tacklers, sweaty pressers, time-wasters, cutback merchants, and Scholes-like pinpoint cross spammers.

That gets pretty frustrating.

In contrast to this, one of the things that most people who come to PEN realise is just how much more relaxed the games are here (overall – no names mentioned…) – how much Frillypinkr the whole playing experience is. That’s because PEN places value in parts of the game often left out in the myClub experience: a slower, thoughtful pace; respect for your opponent; finding balance in your squad; football that looks Frillypink, or realistic; and “silver” players with dribbling and skill cards.

Generally, then, it looks like two things are true: (1) playing in myClub is more irritating than the theme tune to early-noughties children’s TV show Balamory; (2) playing games on PEN is as soothing and fun as this guy talking about how enjoyable dentistry can be (I’ve never wanted a filling so bad!)

And yet, despite all this, in a way PEN needs myClub. Bizarre as that sounds, a lot of people find PEN after venting frustrations with myClub and seeking out a Frillypinkr, more engaging way to play PES. I myself am one of those people, and I know plenty others on the forum are too — increasingly so. After all, myClub has become the default way to play PES online, while the offline community has unfortunately dwindled somewhat (Konami seriously need to overwork Master League!).

With all this in mind, we can’t close off from those who play myClub entirely, because they’re both the most likely to want to join PEN and also face the most difficulties adapting. So: what are the challenges that players coming over from myClub face? And how does playing in PEN leagues change you as a player?

End of Part One. See Part Two for a discussion of the differences between PEN and myClub.

Read 42 times Last modified on Monday, 12 February 2018 03:36